3.30.2007

Paschal




This morning, I found this hymn by

St. John of Damascus

(d. c. 754).

I was reading through my copy of Hymns Ancient & Modern which was given suddenly to me at Bath Abbey; looking for Paschal hymns, & for inspiration for my upcoming post on Neal B's lent blog. (April 4)

'Tis the spring of souls today;
Christ hath burst his prison,
and from three day's sleep in death
as a sun hath risen,
long and dark, is flying
from his light, to whom we give
laud and praise undying.

Now the queen of seasons, bright
with the day of splendour,
with the royal feast of feasts,
comes its joy to render;
comes to glad Jerusalem
who with true affection
welcomes in unwearied strains
Jesu's resurrection.

Alleluia now we cry
to our King immortal,
who triumphant burst the bars
of the tomb's dark portal;
Alleluia with the Son
God the Father praising;
Alleuia yet again
to the Spirit raising.'

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wow-that is wonderful!
Thank you, Rosa.
XO-Mum

Rosa said...

Just giving you something to do at work! (:

Anonymous said...

Don't you know that skiving is a time honored tradition amongst the working classes?? A girls gotta take a break now and then! :-P
XO-Mum

Read Your Way Through the Garden: Choice Tomes From Garden Literature

  • A Book of Salvias by Betsy Clebsch
  • Botany for Gardeners by Brian Capon
  • Making Bentwood Trellises by Jim Long
  • RHS Encyclopedia of Plants & Flowers
  • Rose Primer: An Organic Approach to Rose Selection & Care by Orin Martin
  • Start With the Soil by Grace Gershuny
  • Sunset Western Garden Book
  • Sunset Western Landscaping Book
  • The Book of Garden Secrets by Patent & Bilderback
  • The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Botany
  • the Gardener's Table: A Guide to Natural Vegetable Growing and Cooking by Richard Merrill & Joe Ortiz
  • The Gardener's Year by Karel Capek
  • The Hutchinson Dictionary of Plant Names: Common & Botanical
  • We Made A Garden by Margaret Fish

lotsa latin: rosa's botanical & etymological ruminations

  • vespertinus: flowers in the evening
  • vernalis:spring
  • veni vidi nates calcalvi: we came, we saw, we kicked butt. This was printed on a T shirt I bought at Abbot's Thrift many years ago. It encircled the NEA symbol. I wish I knew why.
  • superciliaris: shaped like an eyebrow ex: sturnella superciliaris, the White-browed Blackbird
  • rosa-sinensis: species of Hibiscus: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis. Lit. Rosa of China, so named by British plant hunters.
  • placentiformis: shaped like a cake ex: discocactus placentiformis
  • nudiflorus: flowers before leaves show ex: flowering quince, magnolia
  • nivalis: growing in or near snow ex: galanthus nivalis (common snowdrop)
  • muralis: growing on walls
  • mirabilis: marvellous, wonderful
  • formosa: beautiful ex: dicentra formosa, a.k.a.western bleeding heart/dutchman's breeches/lady in a bath
  • carpe vitam: get a life
  • Carolus Linnaeus: Latinized name of Carl von Linne (1707-1778), Swedish naturalist considered the father of plant taxonomy. Whatta guy.