10.29.2007

Musings of the Walker::Kirsten, Dundee


Introducing Musings of the Walker, a blog by my friend, Kirsten (Walker), of Dundee, Scotland.
I first met Kirsten in YWAM, at the Seamill Centre, where she was a student and I was on staff as the groondskeepahrr. She hearkens from Athelstaneford, a town of too many syllables for me to pronounce with ease. Athel___ford is, I believe, near Edinburgh. Kirsten's one of the few people I know who's house has a name: The Manse (her father is a Church of Scotland minister. -Kirsten, do you mind this much disclosure? Sorry!) I remember in particular a great night of busting out old tunes in the red-tiled kitchen of the Seamill Centre, when we were on dish duty with her. Since she grew up in the (sniff!) Church of Scotland and we were hymn fans, we ended up harmonizing on a robust rendition of 'Praise to the Lord', you know, the one by that superstar of 17th century hymnody, Joachim Neander. And besides having one of my favourite Scottish accents, she has the distinction of being the person who first introduced me to that great Scottish slang word, 'mingin'.
Kirsten is currently living in Dundee, which is sort of in the middle of the country, north a bit from Edinburgh by 45 minutes or so (help me out here, Kirsten, or Jessica). She's been there for a few years now, sharing the love of God in a city that needs it.
I appreciate that about her, that she is trying to be faithful to share the good things in her life. So, check out her blog, and do be sure to ask her about what she got up to at St. Andrew's Uni. I don't think St. Andrew's ever quite recovered from Kirsten's student years there.....

3 comments:

Kirsten said...

Hahahahaaaaa!!!
No probs with the info, Colleen :) Feel really encouraged by your post, actually. Man, I'd almost forgotten about that washing up session at Seamill! Happy days :D

Susan Harwood said...

Dear Rosa

On one of your blog entries, you said you might review THE BRICKS IN THE CAVE - and I pop back to your site ocassionally to see if you have. It would be really interesting to know your opinion!

Susan

rosa said...

Oh Susan, I'm so sorry! i never imagined you were popping in again! I'm warming up to the topic, and I AM going to do it! I love Bricks in the Cave, and I WILL tell the world

Read Your Way Through the Garden: Choice Tomes From Garden Literature

  • A Book of Salvias by Betsy Clebsch
  • Botany for Gardeners by Brian Capon
  • Making Bentwood Trellises by Jim Long
  • RHS Encyclopedia of Plants & Flowers
  • Rose Primer: An Organic Approach to Rose Selection & Care by Orin Martin
  • Start With the Soil by Grace Gershuny
  • Sunset Western Garden Book
  • Sunset Western Landscaping Book
  • The Book of Garden Secrets by Patent & Bilderback
  • The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Botany
  • the Gardener's Table: A Guide to Natural Vegetable Growing and Cooking by Richard Merrill & Joe Ortiz
  • The Gardener's Year by Karel Capek
  • The Hutchinson Dictionary of Plant Names: Common & Botanical
  • We Made A Garden by Margaret Fish

lotsa latin: rosa's botanical & etymological ruminations

  • vespertinus: flowers in the evening
  • vernalis:spring
  • veni vidi nates calcalvi: we came, we saw, we kicked butt. This was printed on a T shirt I bought at Abbot's Thrift many years ago. It encircled the NEA symbol. I wish I knew why.
  • superciliaris: shaped like an eyebrow ex: sturnella superciliaris, the White-browed Blackbird
  • rosa-sinensis: species of Hibiscus: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis. Lit. Rosa of China, so named by British plant hunters.
  • placentiformis: shaped like a cake ex: discocactus placentiformis
  • nudiflorus: flowers before leaves show ex: flowering quince, magnolia
  • nivalis: growing in or near snow ex: galanthus nivalis (common snowdrop)
  • muralis: growing on walls
  • mirabilis: marvellous, wonderful
  • formosa: beautiful ex: dicentra formosa, a.k.a.western bleeding heart/dutchman's breeches/lady in a bath
  • carpe vitam: get a life
  • Carolus Linnaeus: Latinized name of Carl von Linne (1707-1778), Swedish naturalist considered the father of plant taxonomy. Whatta guy.