1.15.2008

Bella the Movie & Why I Am Not A Catholic Groupie



I can't say enough about Bella-it was just so, so great. I see movies in the theatre pretty rarely, a combination of MacFrugal-ness and a general dearth of films that interest me, I guess. Also, there's the thought that everything I see will be filed away somewhere on my hard drive-and do I really want to carry around National Treasure 2 for the rest of my life?
But, Lisa called and invited me, and suddenly I found myself sitting at the Del Mar Theatre (site of one of my favorite Mcjobs-I think I brought new meaning to the word slacker that summer (remember, Contessa?) Anyway, as I sat there in the dark,with the story unfolding before me, I suddenly realized that I couldn't stop weeping. I chewed on my thumbnail, trying not to make any sound. I was coming off an emotionally draining week, and had been looking forward to a few hours without the B.T. (beloved toddler) getting tangled up in my legs as if I was trying to tread water in a kelp forest.
Bella is dazzling: life-affirming, hope-filled & joyous; I left the film wanting to see my daughter, to hug her, to watch her jump and dance to B's ukulele.
I was going to download the trailer from You Tube to post here, but I have a general aversion to You Tube blog posts-they take too long to download, and I'm liable to get antsy enough to actually begin the task from which I am procrastinating in the first place. So go look it up yourself.
Confession
I went to the only showing of it in Santa Cruz county last weekend; a benefit for the Siena House, a Catholic maternity home in the old nunnery between Holy Cross Church and the old Santa Cruz Mission. I have volunteered for the Siena House in the past, working in their walled garden, at least I did until I completely flaked on them. It's been nearly 3 years, but I still slink down in my seat a little bit when I drive past. I would like to resume work in their garden, but I am afraid I will only let them down again.
Why I Am Not A Catholic Groupie, After All: Tales from the Catholic Steak House
I had to go to the local Catholic bookstore to buy the tix, presumably because it was a benefit. I began to nose around the back of the store and after a while I realized I'd broken one of my cardinal (hehe) rules when it comes to the Catholics: don't look too closely. I'm sorry to say it, but it's true. I always get enamored of the holidays, traditions, poetry, writers (Chesterton, Tolkien, etc) architecture, art, music, acts of mercy and incarnational living; but eventually I come up against one wee little thing: their decidedly wacky theology. I ended up guffawing loudly in the children's section at the Catechism flash cards and a book called The Prenatal Christ that featured drawings of Mary's glowing belly and a voice coming out of it saying,"I am the zygote Jesus, and I have gestated for approximately 3 weeks." I had to leave the store. But not before I bought a cool little book of Francis Thompson's "Hound of Heaven"; (I'm sort of related to him, and it's a fabulous poem.) But see what I mean? Where else would I find that poem, illustrated so groovy, for only $4?
Angus D
So go visit this place: 'Agnus Dei Bookstore'; (that's 'Lamb of God' for all those Germanic language speakers out there)-situated in all it's papist glory right downtown, in the old mortuary building on the corner of Walnut and Cedar Sts. Some time back at a local parade it was mistakenly announced as the 'Angus D', and it's been known in our circle as the Catholic Steak House every since.

5 comments:

Camille said...

thanks for your lovely post! I laughed until I cried. :P

rosa said...

I was at 327 tonight and, leaving the john, caught a glimpse into your old room! I caught my breath, and was suddenly awash with Camille-missing.....it was tragic. Red rover, red rover, send Offenbach on over!

Anonymous said...

Hey Rosa,
I giggled for, like, 5 minutes at this post! The wacky theology in the murky back corners of protestant bookstores never made me laugh this hard.
eleven

The Contessa said...

Ah, yes, I remember it well... That Crazy Summer...

Rosa my dear,

I love your "voice" and your humor. I could sit here and read you all morning, if not for that pesky responsibility called "job."

Fondly,
Contessa

rosa said...

feelin' the sister love!

Read Your Way Through the Garden: Choice Tomes From Garden Literature

  • A Book of Salvias by Betsy Clebsch
  • Botany for Gardeners by Brian Capon
  • Making Bentwood Trellises by Jim Long
  • RHS Encyclopedia of Plants & Flowers
  • Rose Primer: An Organic Approach to Rose Selection & Care by Orin Martin
  • Start With the Soil by Grace Gershuny
  • Sunset Western Garden Book
  • Sunset Western Landscaping Book
  • The Book of Garden Secrets by Patent & Bilderback
  • The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Botany
  • the Gardener's Table: A Guide to Natural Vegetable Growing and Cooking by Richard Merrill & Joe Ortiz
  • The Gardener's Year by Karel Capek
  • The Hutchinson Dictionary of Plant Names: Common & Botanical
  • We Made A Garden by Margaret Fish

lotsa latin: rosa's botanical & etymological ruminations

  • vespertinus: flowers in the evening
  • vernalis:spring
  • veni vidi nates calcalvi: we came, we saw, we kicked butt. This was printed on a T shirt I bought at Abbot's Thrift many years ago. It encircled the NEA symbol. I wish I knew why.
  • superciliaris: shaped like an eyebrow ex: sturnella superciliaris, the White-browed Blackbird
  • rosa-sinensis: species of Hibiscus: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis. Lit. Rosa of China, so named by British plant hunters.
  • placentiformis: shaped like a cake ex: discocactus placentiformis
  • nudiflorus: flowers before leaves show ex: flowering quince, magnolia
  • nivalis: growing in or near snow ex: galanthus nivalis (common snowdrop)
  • muralis: growing on walls
  • mirabilis: marvellous, wonderful
  • formosa: beautiful ex: dicentra formosa, a.k.a.western bleeding heart/dutchman's breeches/lady in a bath
  • carpe vitam: get a life
  • Carolus Linnaeus: Latinized name of Carl von Linne (1707-1778), Swedish naturalist considered the father of plant taxonomy. Whatta guy.