8.13.2010

Rosa's (Inappropriate) Poetry Archives: Richard Cranshaw

To Susie, who is abandoning her alliterative last name in just a matter of hours, I dedicate this truly terrible poem, found in an innocuous Everyman collection entitled, Marriage Poems. While it is true that every poem found between the covers of this book is technically about marriage, not every poem (or any, really) are appropriate to read at a wedding. And okay, I admit it, I found this at Abbot's Thrift last week and thought, "I'm looking for meaningful poetry to read at Susie's wedding, awesome!"

SFX: throat clearing, and then in deep sonorous tones:

 AN EPITAPH UPON HUSBAND
AND WIFE WHO DIED AND
WERE BURIED TOGETHER
To these whom death again did wed
This grave's the second marriage-bed.
For though the hand of Fate could force
'Twixt soul and body a divorce,
It could not sever man and wife,
Because they both lived but one life.
Peace, good reader, do not weep;
Peace, the lovers are asleep.
They, sweet turtles, folded lie
In the last knot that love could tie.
Let them sleep, let them sleep on,
Till the stormy night be gone,
And the eternal morrow dawn;
Then the curtains will be drawn,
And they awake into a light
Whose day shall never die in night.
-Richard Cranshaw

(sweet turtles!)

3 comments:

Mum said...

Oh, my goodness! Shame on Richard Cranshaw! The part about "sweet turtles" is just wrong.

rosa said...

And something about drawing the curtains in the end-should be a joyful bit about heaven, but instead reminds me of the curtains in the windows of the hearse.....an all around stinker of a poem.

Izzie said...

Ooooo! If only we'd found this SOONER!

Read Your Way Through the Garden: Choice Tomes From Garden Literature

  • A Book of Salvias by Betsy Clebsch
  • Botany for Gardeners by Brian Capon
  • Making Bentwood Trellises by Jim Long
  • RHS Encyclopedia of Plants & Flowers
  • Rose Primer: An Organic Approach to Rose Selection & Care by Orin Martin
  • Start With the Soil by Grace Gershuny
  • Sunset Western Garden Book
  • Sunset Western Landscaping Book
  • The Book of Garden Secrets by Patent & Bilderback
  • The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Botany
  • the Gardener's Table: A Guide to Natural Vegetable Growing and Cooking by Richard Merrill & Joe Ortiz
  • The Gardener's Year by Karel Capek
  • The Hutchinson Dictionary of Plant Names: Common & Botanical
  • We Made A Garden by Margaret Fish

lotsa latin: rosa's botanical & etymological ruminations

  • vespertinus: flowers in the evening
  • vernalis:spring
  • veni vidi nates calcalvi: we came, we saw, we kicked butt. This was printed on a T shirt I bought at Abbot's Thrift many years ago. It encircled the NEA symbol. I wish I knew why.
  • superciliaris: shaped like an eyebrow ex: sturnella superciliaris, the White-browed Blackbird
  • rosa-sinensis: species of Hibiscus: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis. Lit. Rosa of China, so named by British plant hunters.
  • placentiformis: shaped like a cake ex: discocactus placentiformis
  • nudiflorus: flowers before leaves show ex: flowering quince, magnolia
  • nivalis: growing in or near snow ex: galanthus nivalis (common snowdrop)
  • muralis: growing on walls
  • mirabilis: marvellous, wonderful
  • formosa: beautiful ex: dicentra formosa, a.k.a.western bleeding heart/dutchman's breeches/lady in a bath
  • carpe vitam: get a life
  • Carolus Linnaeus: Latinized name of Carl von Linne (1707-1778), Swedish naturalist considered the father of plant taxonomy. Whatta guy.