1.07.2013

Introducing a New Blog: Tremulous Beginnings


It's good to be back here at rosa-sinensis! I'm here in a new capacity, via iPad and wireless keyboard, feeling so Jetsons and tremulous, which is a weird combination. This whole post is really just a lead up to a new blog I'm starting, the back story because I love context.
The Back Story
So we moved. sort of. it's crazy, because it's the one thing that we don't seem to do: move. I've lived at our present address for 15 years, 700 sq ft which get smaller every year as our family grows. Now there are 4 of us, and we live the Russian Nesting Doll life, everything must stack or nest or deflate in order to remain within the confines of our li'l space. And it's been fine, for a long time. Especially considering how palatial my home is compared to most of the world. And there is plenty of love there, which is the seasoning element which makes the soup of our life so savory. (Not sure about that metaphor.) B especially seems to revel in the challenge of the small space living; he should have worked in railroad car design, he always wants things to fold down from walls, or recess in the ceiling. And we've been up to the challenge. It's been a hobby, in a similar vein with  trying to keep our two aged and decrepit VW Beetles running.  Our small space challenges took up a lot of time and brainpower, not to mention stubbed toes and bonked heads by the children as they would careen through the house, bouncing off table legs and bookcase corners. I salute everyone of our friends living within the confines of a little house, our Small Space Heroes.....but the thing with the VW Beetles? We couldn't keep them running-so in the end, we sold them.
And so, in the back of my praying mind, I've been talking to God about something new. Somehow. (It has been hard not to whine.)
Something New
May 2012, imagine our gobsmacked faces when we got the news that we would be moving, a few blocks away, still within our sylvan burgh to a place that is over 2,000 sq ft! A big, lovely, red house built in the New England salt box style in 1927. There's a remodel in the works that will add 750 sq ft, a literal mother-in-law unit, which will be for B's mom, S. The remodel happens in a couple months, as long as our plans are approved-God willing, and the creek don't rise. Or the oaks fall. But I try not to think like that anymore, this whole thing is a miracle, and I want to act like it.
I've always said that God gives me better than I even knew I could ask for. That has been true with B, and also with my Littles, G & H. And now this. My whiny prayers were for 5 more square feet of storage space, or even a linen closet, and now we've got one whole floor (basement) dedicated to that very thing. I am overwhelmed everyday.
We should be moving into the finished house at the end of the summer. In the meantime, we have been living up at our new place, after furnishing it with odds and ends from S's old house (think French country and toile) and just scraping off the top strata of our life from our old place and moving up. We'll be going back to the old place come March, during the remodel. Which makes for a lot of too-in and fro-ing, but it is so lovely up here, so big and gorgeous under the oaks that we couldn't keep away.
Hey, I'm writing again!
Don't know how long this will last, this combination of time, quiet, computer and mental bandwidth, but while it does I want to chronicle the life of the garden as it comes together. I've started a new blog to do that, with a serious nod to M.I. McAllister for the title! I hope I can keep it up, writing is something I love and miss, (poor old forgotten rosa-sinensis!)
So here is The Oakmantle Chronicles please stop by!

2 comments:

Camille Offenbach said...

So exciting! It was so lovely hanging out in your new digs yesterday-- I literally lost my littles a few times, a physical impossibility at your old place. Looking forward to reading your new blog-- you are so talented!

Deborah @Online PhD Degree Programs said...

Nothing forces innovation like having limited square footage in a home. Kudos to you for finding a way to balance a small house and family for so long. Congratulations on your new house, now you do not have to cringe every time you add a new piece to your storage space.

Deborah from Online PhD Degree Programs

Read Your Way Through the Garden: Choice Tomes From Garden Literature

  • A Book of Salvias by Betsy Clebsch
  • Botany for Gardeners by Brian Capon
  • Making Bentwood Trellises by Jim Long
  • RHS Encyclopedia of Plants & Flowers
  • Rose Primer: An Organic Approach to Rose Selection & Care by Orin Martin
  • Start With the Soil by Grace Gershuny
  • Sunset Western Garden Book
  • Sunset Western Landscaping Book
  • The Book of Garden Secrets by Patent & Bilderback
  • The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Botany
  • the Gardener's Table: A Guide to Natural Vegetable Growing and Cooking by Richard Merrill & Joe Ortiz
  • The Gardener's Year by Karel Capek
  • The Hutchinson Dictionary of Plant Names: Common & Botanical
  • We Made A Garden by Margaret Fish

lotsa latin: rosa's botanical & etymological ruminations

  • vespertinus: flowers in the evening
  • vernalis:spring
  • veni vidi nates calcalvi: we came, we saw, we kicked butt. This was printed on a T shirt I bought at Abbot's Thrift many years ago. It encircled the NEA symbol. I wish I knew why.
  • superciliaris: shaped like an eyebrow ex: sturnella superciliaris, the White-browed Blackbird
  • rosa-sinensis: species of Hibiscus: Hibiscus rosa-sinensis. Lit. Rosa of China, so named by British plant hunters.
  • placentiformis: shaped like a cake ex: discocactus placentiformis
  • nudiflorus: flowers before leaves show ex: flowering quince, magnolia
  • nivalis: growing in or near snow ex: galanthus nivalis (common snowdrop)
  • muralis: growing on walls
  • mirabilis: marvellous, wonderful
  • formosa: beautiful ex: dicentra formosa, a.k.a.western bleeding heart/dutchman's breeches/lady in a bath
  • carpe vitam: get a life
  • Carolus Linnaeus: Latinized name of Carl von Linne (1707-1778), Swedish naturalist considered the father of plant taxonomy. Whatta guy.